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Education must-reads: From a school district gone after California’s deadliest wildfire to the funding boosts schools can expect in Newsom’s first budget, 7 new things to know about California’s schools (and beyond)

LA School Report | November 16, 2018



7 must-reads on the education beat today:

After the fire, a school district gone

More than 4,200 Paradise Unified School District students lost their homes in the Camp Fire — the deadliest wildfire in California history. Scores of teachers and several school board members were also left homeless, according to officials with the Butte County Office of Education. The fire consumed eight of Paradise Unified’s nine schools, including Paradise Elementary, with Paradise High School the only one left standing. It also destroyed nearly 9,000 homes in the town of 27,000 residents. As of Friday morning, 63 people were confirmed dead and more than 600 were still missing. By David Washburn and Diana Lambert, EdSource.

As economy booms, schools, community colleges can expect modest increase in Newsom’s first budget, EdSource

New California coalition agrees on next steps to improve schools, student achievement, EdSource

Unions Finally Come To The Table With Parents To Explore Healthcare Cost Savings, Speak UP

San Diego Unified denies renewal of Thrive charter schools, raising debate about how to judge school quality, San Diego Union-Tribune

Many States Lack Focus on Equity in School Improvement, Report Suggests, Education Week

Students Ratify School Safety Bill of Rights Calling for New Gun Control, Mental Health Programs, The 74

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See previous morning roundups below:


THURSDAY, NOV. 15: Talk about a super-close election. Check out the new vote totals in the race for California’s schools chief

Talk about a super-close election. Check out the new vote totals in the race for California’s schools chief

Talk about close races. Take a look at the vote totals in the contest for California superintendent of public instruction. A week after the vote, a decision has not yet been made in the race between two Democrats, state legislator Tony Thurmond, who supports traditional public schools, and Marshall Tuck, a former charter school network president. With more than 7 million votes cast, only a few thousand separate the two after a campaign that cost at least $50 million — all for a position that has no policymaking power. By Valerie Strauss, The Washington Post

LAUSD Must Tell Parents About Lead in Water, Speak Up

Students Raise Thousands To Help Teacher Whose Home Burned In The Woolsey Fire, LAist

Thurmond opens substantial lead over Tuck in race for California schools chief, EdSource

Schools Are Spending Millions on Safety. How Will They Know It’s Working?, Education Week

New FBI Data: School-Based Hate Crimes Jumped 25 Percent Last Year — For the Second Year in a RowThe 74

In a shift, more education reformers say they’re worried about schools’ focus on testing, Chalkbeat

 


WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14: Thurmond opens substantial lead over Tuck in race for California schools chief

Thurmond opens substantial lead over Tuck in race for California schools chief

In what may be a pivotal moment in the race, Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, D-Richmond, has taken a substantial lead over Marshall Tuck in the contest for California’s state superintendent of public instruction. Thurmond has not only erased the 86,000 vote lead Marshall Tuck enjoyed last Wednesday, but as of Tuesday at 6 p.m. now leads Tuck by a 67,161 vote margin, according to the latest figures released Tuesday afternoon by the California Secretary of State. The count last Wednesday did not include millions of uncounted mail-in ballots that arrived after Election Day, or provisional ballots issued at polling stations. The latest figures indicate that Thurmond has 50.4 percent of the vote, and Tuck 49.6 percent. Thurmond currently has 3,915,268 votes, compared to Tuck’s 3,848,107. Thurmond increased his lead based on counties tallying over 500,000 more votes over the last 24 hours. By Louis Freedberg, EdSource

California State Schools Chief Announces Approval of First Instructional Materials Based on Next Generation Science Standards, Sierra Sun Times

UTLA’s toxic rhetoric sets a bad example, hinders progress, Los Angeles Daily News

Transgender Activist Among Many Parents Vying For District 5 Board Seat, Speak Up

California’s new governor has a pricey plan for its colleges, Education Dive

Educational freedom and quality at stake in close state education raceThe Sun

As they fled fire, teachers feared they would die in cars with their students, Education Week

Like a Prayer: Madonna Donates $100,000 to Help Detroit Charter School Move From Church Basement Into a Building of Its Own, The 74

Betsy DeVos’ staff denies rumor she’s leaving education secretary job, Detroit Free Press

 


TUESDAY, NOV. 13: Thurmond takes lead over Tuck in race for California schools chief

Thurmond takes lead over Tuck in race for California schools chief

As California counties continue to process mail-in and provisional ballots, Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, D-Richmond, has for the first time taken a narrow lead in the race for California’s state superintendent of public instruction. Thurmond has erased the 86,000 vote lead Marshall Tuck enjoyed last Wednesday, according to the latest figures released on Monday afternoon by the California Secretary of State. The earlier count did not include millions of uncounted mail-in ballots that arrived after Election Day, or provisional ballots issued at polling stations. The latest figures indicate that both Tuck and Thurmond have 50 percent of the vote, but that Thurmond has 3,500 votes more than Tuck.  Thurmond currently has 3,613,883 votes, compared to Tuck’s 3,610,380. By Louis Freedberg, EdSource

Voters give another multi-billion-dollar thumbs up to school bonds, CALmatters

The 2020 Presidential Field and Education: Your Very Early Cheat Sheet, Education Week

‘I hope people call me insane’: Social media posts, former teachers reveal alarming mind-set of Thousand Oaks gunman, Los Angeles Times

A three-point education agenda for California in 2019, EdSource

Schools in Ventura and Los Angeles counties close amid Woolsey, Hill fires, Los Angeles Daily News

Rotherham: 5 Ways the Midterm Elections Will Have Major Implications for Education Reform, The 74

Why aren’t we protecting our young?, EdSource

 


FRIDAY, NOV. 9: Tuck’s lead over Thurmond narrows dramatically in race for California’s school chief

Tuck’s lead over Thurmond narrows dramatically in race for California’s school chief

As California counties continue to count mail-in and provisional ballots, Marshall Tuck’s lead over Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, D-Richmond, has narrowed dramatically in the race for California’s state superintendent of public instruction. As of Sunday, Nov. 11 at 9 p.m, Tuck, with 50.2 percent of the vote, was only .4 percent ahead of Thurmond, who had 49.8 percent, according to the California Secretary of State. 

In the non-partisan state superintendent’s race, Tuck is now only 29,424 votes ahead of Thurmond, out of just over 7 million ballots reported by the Secretary of State. But after Tuesday’s vote Tuck led Thurmond by about 85,916 votes, indicating that the millions of uncounted ballots at that time are tilting strongly in Thurmond’s favor. By Louis Freedberg, EdSource

Pepperdine Closes Malibu, Calabasas Campuses Through Thanksgiving Holiday Due to Woolsey Fire, KTLA

LAUSD Wants Parents To Send Kids To School During A Strike, But Many Questions Remain Unanswered, Speak Up

L.A. Unified apologizes for keeping mum about armed man who tried to lure middle school girls off campus, Los Angeles Times

Education activists were big players in this year’s elections, but they ran into a red wall in GOP-friendly states, CNBC

Most California school construction bonds, parcel taxes pass, EdSource

Some Students Got To Watch Their Teachers Win Big On Tuesday, Huffington Post

More California school administrators gain skills as early-childhood leaders, Education Dive

EDlection2018 Final Count: Taking Stock of All the Governor and Superintendent Races, The 74

Small Classes, Small Benefits, U.S. News & World Report

 


FRIDAY, NOV. 9: Gunman kills 12 at Thousand Oaks bar packed with college students

Gunman kills 12 at Thousand Oaks bar packed with college students

A former U.S. Marine machine gunner who may have suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder burst into a Thousand Oaks bar packed with college students late Wednesday night, tossed a smoke bomb into the crowd and opened fire, authorities said. Eleven people were killed, in addition to a sheriff’s sergeant responding to the scene who was gunned down by the assailant minutes later. The Borderline Bar and Grill was hosting line-dancing lessons for college students as young as 18 on Wednesday night. Crowds of young people, including parties for two women celebrating their 21st birthdays, were drinking and dancing when the crack of gunfire echoed through the cavernous room about 11:20 p.m. Los Angeles Times

Newsom’s cradle-to-career plan for education is ambitious — and expensive, EdSource

So is California’s new schools chief Tuck or Thurmond? Why we don’t know yet, CALMatters

Midterms test the durability of the teacher uprising, Washington Post

A 2018 EDlection Cheat Sheet: Recapping the 70 Candidates, Races & Winners That Matter Most for American Education Policy, The 74

A half century ago, race for California schools chief most contentious in the state, EdSource

A man was caught with an arsenal of weapons outside an L.A. middle school. Parents want to know why it was kept secret, Los Angeles Times

Nearly $70,000 Raised For Maywood H.S. Teacher Who Fought With Student, NBC Los Angeles

Betsy DeVos Releases ‘Parent Guide’ to ESSA Report Cards, Education Week

Immigrant students find hope in soccer, but some states won’t let them play, Hechinger Report

The importance of gender in early childhood education policy, Brookings Institution

 


WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7: What Tuesday’s election could mean for California education

What Tuesday’s election could mean for California education

Tuesday’s statewide elections could have a major impact on California’s education system. That’s the case even though education remains a mostly local issue in the state. Locally elected school boards run the state’s nearly 1,000 school districts, and reforms championed by Gov. Jerry Brown have devolved even more power to local school districts. On top of that, the amount of money the state spends on its K-12 schools and community colleges is strictly prescribed by Proposition 98, approved by voters two decades ago. By Louis Freedberg, EdSource

School chief’s plan would divide L.A. school district into 32 networks, Los Angeles Times

Midterm EDlection Liveblog: Rolling Updates, Results & Reactions From 53 Key Midterm Races That Could Drive Education Policy Into the Next Decade, The 74

9 Takeaways You Need To Know About Education And Tuesday’s Election, NPR

School districts face ‘more serious’ budget reality than during recession, county school official says, San Diego Union-Tribune

Charter school supporters and critics are big spenders in some Bay Area school board elections, EdSource

Schools, cities and counties will ask California voters to OK taxes and borrowing totaling $20 billion, Los Angeles Times

Maywood teacher arrested after being caught on video punching student, Los Angeles Times

Despite popularity with parents and teachers, review of research finds small benefits to small classes, Hechinger Report

Amazon’s new goal: Teach 10 million kids a year to code, Education Week

 


MONDAY, NOV. 5: With California school bonds, the rich get richer and the poor, not so much

With California school bonds, the rich get richer and the poor, not so much

Schools in California’s wealthier communities have been reaping far more local bond money than poorer districts, a CALmatters analysis shows—a reality that amplifies existing inequities for the state’s public school students. Districts with the lowest concentrations of students on free or reduced lunch, a poverty indicator, have averaged more than twice as many local bond dollars per student since 1998 as the most impoverished districts. And depending on where your children go to school, they could be benefitting from as much as $270,000 per pupil in local bond money over the past two decades, or as little as $838—or nothing. By Ricardo Cano, CALmatters

Swastika on campus shocks community at Calabasas High School, where it becomes a ‘teachable moment’, Los Angeles Daily News

Gavin Newsom pushes big-budget early childhood education agenda in closing days of campaign, Los Angeles Times

Differences between Marshall Tuck and Tony Thurmond are real, as are areas of agreement, EdSource

State superintendent race: 50 million bucks for a bully pulpit, Los Angeles Daily News

What A Smelly High School Band Uniform Has To Do With Burbank’s Measure QS, LAist

Here’s what voters should know about San Diego Unified’s $3.5 billion school bond measure, San Diego Union-Tribune

Analysis: Schools With the Highest Grad Rates Have the Lowest Student Mobility. What Does That Say About This Measure of School Success?, The 74

Are K–12 Students Keeping Pace in English?, Public Policy Institute of California

Teacher residencies have many admirers but still train few teachers. California may be about to change thatChalkbeat

‘We’re just fed up’: Teachers running for office in record numbers, motivated by low pay and education cuts, USA Today

California, L.A. Agree: Locking Up Young Children is ‘Nothing Good for Nobody’, The Chronicle of Social Change

Goldberg Launches Campaign for LAUSD Board of Education Seat, Los Feliz Ledger

Is the Nation’s First Charter School Strike Imminent?, Education Week

 


THURSDAY, NOV. 1: Oakland risks state takeover if it fails to make budget cuts, state and county officials warn

Oakland risks state takeover if it fails to make budget cuts, state and county officials warn

If Oakland Unified doesn’t make millions of dollars in budget cuts over the next four years, it could risk another state takeover, state and county officials said. A bailout approved by the state Legislature in the AB1840 education finance bill could relax the timeline for those cuts, but also requires the school district board to follow through on its plans to close schools and eliminate staff positions. The state funding is expected to help the district close its budget deficit over the next four years, with the first allocation coming in 2019-20 if the district meets certain “benchmarks.” By Theresa Harrington, EdSource

LAUSD Makes New Offer To Teachers Union. Union Leaders Call It A ‘Trojan Horse’, LAist

New California leadership must take up educational justice, EdSource

Seven Questions About All Those ‘Educators Running for Office’ Stories, The 74

Youth will determine the outcome of the 2018 midterms, Hechinger Report

A rare look inside classrooms finds some poorly trained teachers wasting time, Washington Post

Burbank Unified announces improved graduation rate, Los Angeles Times

Students celebrated Mexican heritage at a La Quinta library. They were told to next time sing ‘Yankee DoodleThDesert Sun

Here’s what happened after California got rid of personal belief exemptions for childhood vaccines, Los Angeles Times

Juul Offered To Pay Schools As Much As $20,000 To Blame Vaping On Peer Pressure, Buzzfeed News

 

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