City, LAUSD announce an LA-wide summer learning program

Los Angeles Summer of Learning Programs LAUSDMayor Eric Garcetti and LA Unified Superintendent John Deasy, along with several private groups, today announced new  citywide initiative to keep youth engaged in learning this summer, the Los Angeles Summer of Learning.

The program provides access to 100 learning opportunities online and in person at LA parks and libraries, LAUSD schools and museums and cultural institutions, such as the Getty Center and Aquarium of the Pacific.

The curriculum is open to those aged 3 to 24 and will offer options in science, technology, engineering, arts and math, as well as a work-readiness pathway to provide skills needed for career success.

“By connecting our students with creative, interactive and interest-driven learning opportunities, we will help our city’s youth learn new skills and prepare to enter the workforce,” Garcetti said in a press release.

“Learning happens everywhere, not only in the classroom,” said Deasy. “More than half of the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income youth is due to unequal access to summer learning opportunities. Thanks to the tremendous collaboration of our community partners, businesses, neighborhoods and city agencies, LA Summer of Learning will help increase access for youth, particularly in underserved neighborhoods.”

The program brings together a coalition of public, private, and non-profit partners, including JPMorgan Chase & Co., The California Endowment, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. JPMorgan Chase contributed $500,000, and The California Endowment donated $200,000.

Signup for the program can be accessed here.

One thought on “City, LAUSD announce an LA-wide summer learning program

  1. Didn’t schools used to offer most of these as part of a regular school day before schools were strip mined of anything remotely interesting for kids? Why then do we need to fund these enrichment activities partly through a corrupt corporate bank that caused many Americans to lose their homes?
    Why aren’t these activities part of the regular school day? For some reason, I think I’m going to have a hard time getting my high school students to sign up for this during the summer. They need these activities, but getting them to sign up will be like pulling teeth. Why not bring back industrial arts and a full slate of ROP classes to the school day? That would make way more sense.

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